‘Indian Matchmaking’: The Dark Reality Behind Your Latest Netflix Binge

I was on the phone with my mother, who lives in Pune, India, complaining about Indian Matchmaking , when she brought up the marriage proposal. I knew she agreed. I scoffed. But watch Indian Matchmaking , and you may end the eight-episode arc of the smartly edited, highly bingeable show with a misleading idea of how arranged marriages actually work. The Netflix reality show follows Sima Taparia, a matchmaker from Mumbai whose pen-and-paper spreadsheets of potential suitors is far from the most outdated thing about her. She flies back and forth between the U. Women need to cook.

Commentary: What Netflix’s ‘Indian Matchmaking’ doesn’t tell you about arranged marriage

Ruchika Tulshyan was 22 when her mother started searching for her future husband. And she has mixed feelings — happy to see her experiences represented but forced to reflect on some hard truths about the way women are objectified within the system. I was disappointed, of course, there’s colorism, there’s casteism, there’s a lot of emphasis on traditional beauty. The show introduces us to a cast of Indian and Indian American men and women — including a single-minded lawyer from Houston, an appearance-obsessed jewelry designer from Mumbai and an outgoing dancer from New Jersey.

As a year-old who had already finished grad school and was on track for a successful career, Tulshyan was shocked to hear that her mom had listed her name and photograph on an Indian matchmaking website without her consent.

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Matchmaker Sima Taparia guides clients in the U. Sima meets three unlucky-in-love clients: a stubborn Houston lawyer, a picky Mumbai bachelor and a misunderstood Morris Plains, N. Friends and family get honest with Pradhyuman. Sima consults a face reader for clarity on her clients. A setback with Vinay temporarily discourages Nadia. Sima offers two more prospects to Aparna.

Feeling the pressure, Pradhyuman finally goes on a date. Nadia has a promising date. Pradhyuman sees a life coach. Sima sends Aparna to an astrologer and seeks a cultural match for guidance counselor Vyasar. A date with a model uplifts Pradhyuman. Vyasar and Rashi instantly bond. As Akshay rejects over 70 matches, Preeti gives him an ultimatum.

‘Indian Matchmaking’ is bringing up uncomfortable issues my culture needs to address

Coronavirus: How Covid has changed the ‘big fat Indian wedding’. India’s richest family caps year of big fat weddings. A new Netflix show, Indian Matchmaking, has created a huge buzz in India, but many can’t seem to agree if it is regressive and cringe-worthy or honest and realistic, writes the BBC’s Geeta Pandey in Delhi.

The eight-part docuseries features elite Indian matchmaker Sima Taparia as she goes about trying to find suitable matches for her wealthy clients in India and the US. In the series, she’s seen jet-setting around Delhi, Mumbai and several American cities, meeting prospective brides and grooms to find out what they are looking for in a life partner.

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The Mumbai-based matchmaker Sima Taparia delivers this meme-friendly one-liner in the seventh episode of the hit Netflix series Indian Matchmaking. But she departs from this well-worn model in her attention to one extra characteristic: caste. This silent shadow hangs over every luxurious living room she leads viewers into. She lumps an entire social system, which assigns people to a fixed place in a hierarchy from birth, together with anodyne physical preferences.

This prejudiced treatment includes, but is hardly limited to, workplace discrimination in the United States. For example, the state of California sued the tech company Cisco in June for allegedly failing to protect a Dalit employee from discrimination by his higher-caste Brahmin managers.

Indian Matchmaking: Netflix’s ‘divisive’ dating show causes storm

I was in the middle of an editorial meeting at the newspaper I worked for in when it came out of nowhere: an overwhelming sense of fear, the trembling hands, the absolute certainty that my heart was going to burst out of my chest. It would be years before I understood that what I had experienced that day — and would on three subsequent occasions — was a panic attack.

I was 24, and just two hours before, my parents had called to ask me to be home on time that night.

Shows like Indian Matchmaking and Family Karma are entertaining, to be respectable and nuanced about the marriage industrial complex.

Every reality show has at least one villain. As Sima and the show itself frequently remind us, arranged marriage is not quite the form of social control it used to be; everyone here emphasizes that they have the right to choose or refuse the matches presented to them. But as becomes especially clear when Sima works in India, that choice is frequently and rather roughly pressured by an anvil of social expectations and family duty. In the most extreme case, a year-old prospective groom named Akshay Jakhete is practically bullied by his mother, Preeti, into choosing a bride.

Indian Matchmaking smartly reclaims and updates the arranged marriage myth for the 21st century, demystifying the process and revealing how much romance and heartache is baked into the process even when older adults are meddling every step of the way. Though these families use a matchmaker, the matching process is one the entire community and culture is invested in. Director Smriti Mundhra told Jezebel that she pitched the show around Sima, who works with an exclusive set of clients. Yet the show merely explains that for many Indian men, bright, bubbly, beautiful Nadia is not a suitable match.

The parents task Sima with following multiple stringent expectations. Some are understandably cultural, perhaps: A preference for a certain language or religion, or for astrological compatibility, which remains significant for many Hindus. Other preferences, though, are little more than discrimination. Divorced clients are also subjected to particularly harsh judgment.

In Netflix’s ‘Indian Matchmaking,’ Arranged Marriage Is The Anti-Entanglement

One of Netflix’s newest reality series Indian Matchmaking gives viewers a glimpse into the world of arranged marriages and Indian culture. Specifically, the show, which was filmed in , follows Mumbai-based matchmaker Sima Taparia and her partner-seeking clients as they navigate the tricky world of dating and compatibility. While the show has been met with notable criticism and sparked important conversations about colorism, casteism, and sexism, the series has quickly become a popular watch on the streaming service.

I learned about Netflix’s new show Indian Matchmaking during a A marriage is a union between two families, not just the bride and groom.

Reality TV dating shows are hotter than ever. Loved the opportunity to sit down and chat with vulture about life after the launch of indianmatchmaking last week. But unfortunately the couples she arranged for the show mostly flopped. None of the participants found love with the people she set them up with. One of the stars of the show, Rupam, ended up finding love on her own.

She is now engaged to someone she met on a dating app. For example, Aparna is still in touch with three of the men she met thanks to the show. Jay, for his part, still sees a future with Aparna. Even though they got along great, their relationship faded because he lives in Atlanta, and she lives in Houston. Distance may have kept them apart, but in the post-COVID world, distance dating is one of the only kinds.

Aparna is open to meeting people through video dates. So thrilled by the amazing response and all the love for indianmatching on netflix Have you seen it? She seemed more excited for him to get married than he was. She even set a date for his wedding before he found the bride.

Is ‘Indian Matchmaking’ realistic? Four UAE couples on how arranged marriages are evolving

Analysis by S. Mitra Kalita , CNN. Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what’s happening in the world as it unfolds. More Videos Why the Netflix show ‘Indian Matchmaking‘ is causing a stir.

Matchmaker Sima Taparia guides clients in the U.S. and India in the arranged marriage process, offering an inside look at the custom in a modern era.

By Sajmun Sachdev August 11, But while I was celebrating what I found to be a super authentic look into the world of matchmaking, arranged marriages and Indian family dynamics, many reviewers and tweeters made me realize that I may be the only South Asian woman who was. So seeing that representation in Indian Matchmaking made me feel proud: Finally an Indian filmmaker had accomplished what we got into this industry to do: She put us on TV.

Indian Matchmaking could never be everything to everybody and still be the success it is. She is, simply, a stereotypical aunty. A divorced woman is a failure. Like the criticisms of Taparia, several people online were unhappy with the traits the participants prioritized when looking for their partners. For example, Ankita is dark-skinned; coupled with the fact she has modern viewpoints, she therefore only receives one match.

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